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NFA SBR Process

Looks like Uncle is going through it. I’ve been thinking about it myself. It really irks me that my AR carbine won’t accept a standard M7 bayonet. The reason is because the extra inch and a half on the barrel. One solution would be to put an M4 upper on it, but that makes it an SBR. I have a few questions if anyone can answer them.

  1. If I put the old upper back on, does it cease to be NFA at that point? Or just being in the NFRTR makes it an SBR no matter what upper you put on it?
  2. Are there issues moving SBRs between states? Do I have to fill out 5320.20 to move it interstate? Or does that only apply to machineguns?

Through curious definition in Pennsylvania law, I can’t carry a loaded rifle in a car. It’s only a summary offense to do so, but it’s a $300 fine. Loaded in this case means ammo not in a separate compartment from the rifle. However, if it’s an SBR, my carry license applies. I wouldn’t car carry a rifle with a round in the chamber, but a loaded magazine near the rifle or inserted into the mag well is considered loaded in PA law.

8 Responses to “NFA SBR Process”

  1. SayUncle says:

    1. no. the lower receiver only is a registered SBR. and it always is.

    2. yes.

    Another solution to your m7 problem is to buy a 14.5 inch barrel and buy one of those phantom flash hiders (they’re just over 1.5 inches) and attach it permanently. The barrel contour will match the bayo and there’s no $200 tax.

  2. Sebastian says:

    I was thinking about the former option. I never attach the bayonet to the rifle, but it just kind of annoys me that the rifle has a longer barrel than it’s supposed to because of the NFA rules. The main reason I’d rather just do the SBR is because it would get me the ability to use that AR as a truck gun, where if it has a barrel longer than 16 inches, it’s not a firearm under the Uniform Firearms Act, and the game prohibitions about loaded rifles in vehicles applies.

    But if I have to tell the feds every time I want to go shooting in Virginia, that’s probably enough to kill the deal.

  3. AughtSix says:

    Or, get an upper with mid-length handguards. The barrel’s the same 16″, but the handguards are that inch and a half longer. It looks somewhat odd (having the extra length, but not rifle length, handguards) but not quite as odd as the stubby handguards with the barrel sticking way out the front.

  4. “I can’t carry a loaded rifle in a car.”

    That’s good to know (I didn’t), though it’s weird. How about a shotgun?

  5. Spence says:

    You don’t need to tell the feds every time, just once a year. My application to Transport Interstate were approved for a period of 1 year. I did have to fill out one for each state, but there is no charge, and they turn around the paper work quickly (about 2 weeks).

    If you do submit the Form 1, they only allow you to list 1 caliber and 1 length on the form one. I listed multiple and they kicked it back.

    So, in order to use multiple uppers, and want to avoid any grey areas, you need to write a letter to ATF in WV. About 3 weeks after I submitted the letter, they sent a letter saying that the record was notated,

    Also, if you make it an SBR, you need to overstamp it with your name , city and state.

  6. Sebastian says:

    You can’t carry any firearm other than firearms in a vehicle while loaded. And firearms only if you have a license, or fall under the exemptions.

    Gotta love Pennsylvania law :)

  7. Nomen Nescio says:

    You can’t carry any firearm other than firearms in a vehicle while loaded. And firearms only if you have a license

    um, say again? did you mean “pistol” for some carefully selected instances of “firearm” in that?

  8. Sebastian says:

    It was a bad attempt at making a joke about Pennsylvania gun laws :)

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