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Like a Cheap Bourbon

ATF’s not-so-fast and not-so-furious has been aging four the past four years like a cheap bourbon no one wants to drink (especially not the Mexicans, who, rumor has it, are going to declare ATF’s liaison to that country persona non grata.) Uncle notes that the Mexican gun canard started up around the same time.

4 Responses to “Like a Cheap Bourbon”

  1. harp1034 says:

    The pot is starting to boil over. The gov’t tried to keep alid on it. I look for an independent counsel to be appointed soon. Somebody will get thrown under the bus.

  2. RuffRidr says:

    Expelling the ATF liason from Mexico is not harsh enough, in my opinion. Their reckless actions have led to the death of hundreds if not thousands of Mexican citizens. Mexico needs to send a clear signal to the ATF and this administration.

  3. Carl from Chicago says:

    It seems to me that Mexico has roundly failed to keep guns outside of their nation’s border. And it seems that once again, many powerful people are trying to blame the US for Mexican failure.

    I’ve about had enough of that kind of thinking.

  4. Harry Schell says:

    The Mexican move is like NPR “accepting Schiller’s resignation”…not the real story.

    It’s clear ATF must have a record of how many guns have been “walked” into Mexico, if they ever planned to arrest/charge anyone. Grassley should get that list. If it has disappeared, ATF is even more stupid or evil than thought. Some heads need to roll on this.

    Additionally, wouldn’t have been nice for the promoters of the “cartel violence on US guns” canard for ATF to make a big bust of US-sourced guns and cartel bad guys? Instead, ATF was too clever by half, and their inability to find or track guns they “walked” made the project an evil waste. Did ATF really think they could trace “walked” guns or buy into the canard and start the project? Either way, it’s bad news.

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