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On Being Made

SayUncle noticed someone carrying in public and snapped a picture. He must have a good eye, because I couldn’t tell myself. I’ve been made twice, both by little kids, whose short height makes it easy for them to see concealed items beneath clothing. The first was Bitter’s nephew, who went to give me a hug goodbye, then awkwardly asks in public “Why do you have a gun on?” The second was more recently, by a friend’s kid, who noticed something in my pocket when he bumped into it, then asked what I had in my pocket. I didn’t answer, so I can’t say I was technically “made” but most people don’t notice the pocket holster.

I’ve been around cops while carrying, and never been made. One was even an accident scene, and when I had a Glock 19 under my shirt. Maybe instead of “stop and frisk,” Bloomberg should just hire little kids.

11 Responses to “On Being Made”

  1. SayUncle says:

    It was hard to capture in a photo. But when he moved, you could see it.

  2. karrde says:

    I’ve also ID’d a person who was carrying.

    Setting: I’m entering the church I regularly attend. One of the women of the church has brought along a new boyfriend. When he sits, I can see something gun-like on his belt, printing against the shirt.

    I didn’t mention it to anyone, because I couldn’t think of a polite way to bring it up.

    One person once saw me carrying during my first year of carry. That person asked calmly why I was carrying a gun.

    (At the time, I was carrying IWB in the small of the back. It was really visible if the tail of my shirt or sweater shifted up or down while I sat. Since then, I went to IWB on right-hip with a better holster, and no one ever asked about it. Same story after I switched to pocket-carry with a flatter pistol. No one has seen it, though I suspect that some kids might notice. Especially if they try to give me a hug around the waist.)

    • Bitter says:

      That’s exactly how my nephew spotted Sebastian’s gun. He hugged him and was only a little taller than waist level.

      We did wonder if he would mention it to my anti-gun sister-in-law, but he has never once said a word.

      • Zermoid says:

        You have an Anti-Gun Sister?
        You haven’t turned her from the Darkside yet?

        • Bitter says:

          Sister-in-law. And I don’t know. Last I heard, she wasn’t completely horrified by the idea of my brother bringing a gun into the home, but she also was very unhappy when we signed my nephew up as a junior NRA member after he had such a good time at the museum. So, yeah, mixed bag.

  3. When I opt for my Smartholster, I’ve decided that if anyone asks what that is under my shorts, I’ll just tell them it’s a hernia truss

  4. Patrick H says:

    Its something I used to really worry about, until I started wearing Woolrich’s shirts. They print much less for me that what I was wearing.

    My response if I was ever made by noticing printing (and not actually seeing the gun) would be that its just my cell phone.

  5. J says:

    “Maybe instead of “stop and frisk,” Bloomberg should just hire little kids.”

    There HAS to be a joke in there somewhere.

  6. harp1034 says:

    No not little kids. Midgets will do better.

  7. The “bump frisk” is a classic low-profile technique in crowded or high-traffic areas. While passing by, you casually bump or brush against the person’s hip.

  8. FatWhiteMan says:

    I was made by my 12 year old nephew in a Wal-Mart. “You’re carrying a gun, aren’t you?”. I asked him if he could see it and if not, how did he know?. His reply was, “no, but its 98 degrees, you’re fat and you are wearing two shirts”.

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