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Ask Tom McClintock a Question

Tom McClintock is a California State Senator.  He’s currently running for Congress in California’s 4th Congressional District, who’s seat is currently occupied by retiring Republican John Doolittle.  Tom has been a strong advocate for the Second Amendment, and conservative principles in California for a long time.  He carries an A rating, and an endorsement from the NRA.  He a good candidate who deserves the support of Golden State gun owners.

I have been offered an opportunity to interview Senator McClintock, and thought I would open up the comments to anyone who wants to ask a question of him.  I have a few I’m thinking of asking, but if someone comes up with a good one, I’d be happy to include it.

10 Responses to “Ask Tom McClintock a Question”

  1. BC says:

    Question: “Tom, why is the California Republican Party so all-around pathetic?”

  2. DirtCrashr says:

    He’s my favorite California politician, I would ask him about Prop 11, the attempt to break the gerrymander impasse – a CA local issue with IMO much broader implications. As CA is gerrymandered, so are the States in effect.
    As a bigger-picture question I’d ask him if he thinks what Bloomberg did to re-coronate himself and overcome term-limits in NY will be repeated around the country.

  3. mike123 says:

    Ask him how conservatives can survive while being surrounded by liberals? We may need to know if Obama is elected. We need strategies if the Dems control the house, senate, and presidency, as the Dems won’t squander the opportunity like W and the Reps. did.

  4. Sebastian says:

    I like the Gerrymandering question. Can you word it in a simple sentence? Not being from California, I don’t know enough about the issue to represent it out of the context you brought up.

  5. DirtCrashr says:

    Err..uh…yeh. Proposition 11 is a proposal to take away from the Stupidslature the task of drawing (and re-drawing) political voting-district boundaries (that are currently gerrymandered), and hand it over to a 14-member commission in an effort to make the State more responsive (and less f*d-up) and less dominated by PBDS: partisan bickering derangement-syndrome, so…

    “Hi Tom, do you think that Prop. 11 will help break the gridlock of partisan dominance enjoyed by the Democrat Central Committee (and their evil, skulking, bat-winged minions), or will it just replace the old system with another un-accountable, un-elected body of Uber-officeholders like The Coastal Commission and the California Air Resources Board – people who play an inordinate, outsized and invasive role in national politics?”
    :-)
    I am leery that Bloomberg (NYer wtf?) suports it, but gladdened that Boxer, Pelosi, and local anti-gun hypocrite with a carry-permit and humongous asshole Don Perata doesn’t.

    http://ballotpedia.org/wiki/index.php?title=California_Proposition_11_(2008)

  6. RAH says:

    I am not up on Proposition 11 but why would a 14 member commision be any better? Are they appointed by liberals and Democrats or by the governor?

    I mean that if the legislature is not doing a good job why would a commision do so? It all depends on who gets appointed and who does the appointing.

  7. RAH says:

    A question I would like answered is there any chance of getting more GOP elected from CA to counter the Pelosi, Boxer problems.

    Is there a good crop of GOP candidates for the state legislature? We need to be constantly recruiting the back benchers to move up when State GOP moves to Federal GOP positions.

    The problem for conservatives and libertarians is getting more good candidates to run against bad Democrats. To ensure that freeedom is maintained and expanded rather than socialist nanny state government.

  8. David Codrea says:

    Excellent. When it’s posted I’ll do what I can to spread the word.

    This is the man who should have been governor.

  9. RC says:

    Tom McClintock is probably the best Republican currently in office in California. Aside from his strong stand on 2A issues, he’s unafraid to be harshly critical of teacher’s unions and California’s atrocious public school system, and has written extensively on such.

    If California politics were run by the likes of him, I’d probably move back.

    As far as questions go:
    “What are your feelings about school vouchers?”
    “How do you feel about California’s may-issue permit system, in which sheriff’s and Chiefs-of-Police have arbitrarily changed licensing criteria (most recently in Kern County and Orange County?”

  10. I’d be interested in finding out about which (if any) areas he thinks gun rights could make progress (not just hold ground, but gain some) in what looks to be a rather hostile Congressional (and presidential) environment for a while.

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