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The Soft Sell

Greg Rotz had a meeting with his local sheriff.  Not the guy who revoked his license to carry, that sheriff retired.  This is the new sheriff.  I link to this because I think it’s a great way to do activism:

In the end he said I was glad I took the time to come see him. He asked if he could keep all of the documentation I presented to him. I told him that was why I brought them. He asked if I had a card. I told him I did not have a personal card, but gave him a PAFOA card, and he wrote my name/number/e-mail on the back. I told him we were not a PAC, and were not trying to offer money in exchange for policy changes, etc. We are not making demands. We just want everyone (citizen and LEO alike) to know what the laws are, so they can be followed. I also asked if he would be willing to attend a local social gathering, and he said he would do so. I promised to keep him updated as plans began to form.

I think you can get more mileage out of a soft sell than you can walking in and making demands.  While they are public servants, they are also people, and they will tend to listen better if you’re treating them well.

4 Responses to “The Soft Sell”

  1. Harry Schell says:

    Usually get more bees with honey than vinegar.

    And those public servants who do need vinegar, sometimes just a little will do.

    The others, no amount of vinegar will ever be enough…they are brain dead.

  2. Elle says:

    “I think you can get more mileage out of a soft sell than you can walking in and making demands. While they are public servants, they are also people, and they will tend to listen better if you’re treating them well.”

    “And those public servants who do need vinegar, sometimes just a little will do.”

    Astute observations gentlemen! A few well placed calm words in the right ears can do far more than a thousand angry emails.

  3. BadIdeaGuy says:

    “A few well placed calm words in the right ears can do far more than a thousand angry emails.”

    That’s true if the person is open to the idea presented, and it’s on an individual level. Those thousand angry emails can sure help too in my view. If the person will not be persuaded to agree with you, it’s worth it to create fear (of the next election).

  4. gnbrotz says:

    “That’s true if the person is open to the idea presented, and it’s on an individual level. Those thousand angry emails can sure help too in my view. If the person will not be persuaded to agree with you, it’s worth it to create fear (of the next election).”

    I agree that both approaches have their place. I’ve found myself in a unique position, and hope I can benefit the local gun-owning community as a whole. This Sheriff has already witnessed firsthand that I know where to find the law, and can interpret it correctly. He also should know that if a court proceeding is required, I’ll do that as well. Now, I don’t even have to ‘bluff’ him on my determination. I can point out errors in his procedures, backed up by statute and case law and do it with a civil tone. I don’t have to make threats. I can simply say, “Do what you want, but be aware that if you are challenged on this issue, you will likely lose in court”. The civil words and the truth of my own previous actions together make a powerful statement (IMO).

    I also want to establish a dialog and foster a relationship with him in the hopes that if another ‘major’ issue comes along, I’m in a good position to represent law-abiding gun owners and hopefully prevent a knee-jerk reaction that my be counter to the law. I have no illusions of replacing his solicitor, but I think mutual respect can go a long way to gradually increasing his own knowledge of applicable law through informal sit-downs and gentle nudges in the right direction.

    In my case, I hope it will be effective since I believe Sheriff Anthony doesn’t suffer from a LEO superiority complex and seems genuinely interested in simply enforcing (and complying with) the law. Nothing more, nothing less.

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