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Peruta, New York, Colorado, oh my!

With so much litigation currently up in the air, and some of it having a shot at having a hugely meaningful impact to improve the growth of the pro-gun community, it seems like a good time to remind any lawyers or seriously legal-minded types about the NRA Foundation’s Law Seminar taking place next month at the Annual Meeting in Indianapolis.

I have to say, there’s rarely been a year that I’ve been more excited by the topics – the issue of the new carry law in Illinois, the nail-biting cases in the jurisdictions where we did suffer some setbacks, and the regular topic that I often find oddly interesting – laws dealing with shooting ranges. Peruta, even though I mention it in the title, isn’t specifically on the schedule. However, when you get a bunch of pro-gun legal minds together, it’s pretty much assured that a big game-changing case like that won’t come up in some form.

Remember, attorneys, it can count for CLE credit. For non-attorneys, you never know what you might learn that can keep you out of jail. For example, I should probably warn my horse farm owning cousin that last year, I learned that riding one’s horse at “unusual speed” on any street or alley is a crime in my home state.

10 Responses to “Peruta, New York, Colorado, oh my!”

  1. Matthew Carberry says:

    “Unusual speed” is the gateway to “Ludicrous Speed.” ;)

    • Bitter says:

      I would like to see a speedometer that tells me what “usual speed” really is! That said, it would be interesting to see ludicrous speed referenced in law. :)

      • SJ says:

        The law about “unusual speed” for horses was probably written when most legislators and policeman would have a rough estimate of a horse’s speed by listening to the way the feet hit the pavement.

        Or observing the difference between walk, trot, canter, and gallop.

        Still, I would like a speedometer calibrated with “usual”, “unusual”, and “ludicrous” speeds.

        • I was reading an early 19th century Indiana statute book, and discovered that riding a horse or carriage or through towns at greater than seven MPH was unlawful.

          • Zermoid says:

            So, what? Don’t mount rockets on the horses sides as that would be “Unusual” speed?

            Do they define “Usual” anywhere in the law?
            What if your horse Usually gallops?

  2. Patrick says:

    I learned that riding one’s horse at “unusual speed” on any street or alley is a crime in my home state.

    Good thing that Paul Revere guy wouldn’t get away with his shenanigans in today’s Pennsylvania. All the King’s Men will make sure that he stays in his place.

  3. Shootin' Buddy says:

    “I was reading an early 19th century Indiana statute book, and discovered that riding a horse or carriage or through towns at greater than seven MPH was unlawful.”

    Today in Indiana you can ride your horse faster than 7 mph, but not on Sunday or you’ll end up in the stocks.

    Shooting ranges? Again? Every year since Louisville it is on the agenda.

  4. RAH says:

    For a horse 7 mph is a walk or a very slow trot. No cantering or galloping. Good horse can do 16 mph at the trot and that is a fast extended trot. Top speed is about 40 mph for only a few seconds. Mostly fast speed would be 30-35 mph. Most horsemen use meter per minute as a speed measurement.

    No one is a small town wanted a horse galloping down the busy area. The chances for collision was high.

  5. Joe_in_Pitt says:

    The small town in VA I used to live right outside of still has an ordinance prohibiting the “riding or driving of horses or other animals at an improper speed”. Thus leaving the door open to conceivably ride an Ostrich as long as you moved slow enough to sip tea while doing it.

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