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The Slow Implosion Stops for Now

I will very seldom post about business stuff on here, but it’s interesting to see my former employer actually turning a profit.  What really gets me interested enough to post is that it seems they want to cash in on the troubelsome practice of civil asset forfeiture:

Separately, Unisys said Wednesday it received a blanket purchase agreement that could allow it to sell $112 million in services to the U.S. Department of Justice’s Asset Forfeiture Management Staff over eight years. The services are to support the staff’s consolidated asset tracking system. The government has already ordered $8 million in services under the agreement.

Boy I’m glad I don’t work for them anymore. Unisys executives have never known a customer so sleazy they wouldn’t deal with them.  I’m glad my labor isn’t going to help the government steal private property more efficiently.

It’s crap like asset forfeiture that makes me laugh at the left when they try to get me to care about the fact that Bush is stomping all over our civil liberties.  Maybe I’ll be able to get worked up about it when the left starts worrying about the civil liberties I’ve already lost because of the War on Drugs.  Sorry, but at the end of the day, I’m a lot more concerned about the government stealing my property without proper due process, than I am about the NSA possibly listening in on phone calls when I call the middle east (which I do oh so regularly, you know).

2 Responses to “The Slow Implosion Stops for Now”

  1. Brad says:

    Unisys isn’t in a position where they can pick and choose their customers. Only a handful of businesses are, really, and if they do too much of that they won’t be in business any longer.

    But of course, I could be biased on the matter.

  2. Sebastian says:

    I understand that they have to look after business. But I’m nonetheless happy I’m not having any part of this. It just always seem to be like Unisys made a habit of throwing their lot in with loser customers or partners, rather than come up with business models that actually worked.

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