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A Day Without Moms Demand

Today is the “Day Without Women” protest. I’ve long written in favor of smart activist tactics, and written against dumb ones. This has had the side effect of limiting my audience, because sometimes dumb activist tactics are very self-satisfying. Perhaps a feeling of righteousness and being part of something you think is contributing something has value of its own? Perhaps that is something I should consider, but it’s just never been my drug. If gun owners were mounting a similar “Day Without Gun Owners,” I’d call it out for useless activism that serves no purpose other than the contribute to activism fatigue (most people have lives to live).

Mom’s Demand is taking part in the Day Without Women, and why shouldn’t they? In fact, if they want to make it the year without women, please do. Decade? Century? I would strongly encourage it! Keep your people basking in that self-satisfied nothing, Shannon Watts. Don’t you ever change.

8 Responses to “A Day Without Moms Demand”

  1. Bitter says:

    They’ll be so disappointed in me today. I’m not wearing red. But I am going to meet up with another woman at a locally-owned restaurant, though one owned by a man. We’re making plans for a women’s group, but one that celebrates the activities of historical men.

  2. Whetherman says:

    “Perhaps a feeling of righteousness and being part of something you think is contributing something has value of its own?”

    I’ll open and close this with smileys for emphasis of it being in good cheer, but,

    :-) I seem to recall you have been an enthusiastic annual attendee at NRA NatCons. And perhaps a gun owners rally or two? :-)

    I shouldn’t spoil the fun by discussing that further, but of course that has a great deal of entertainment value associated with it. Yet, it is still the same phenomenon.

    Let’s just say, that the value of people making psychological commitments via gestures cannot be readily quantified.

    • Sebastian says:

      I go to NRAAM for networking more than because it’s great activism. But it’s a fair point otherwise. I’ve generally been willing to be a head to be counted when I’ve felt it might matter. But I’ve never particularly loved protesting, other than for people watching.

      But I am starting to understand that the tactic might have value in what you said can’t be easily quantified.

      • Whetherman says:

        “the tactic might have value in what you said can’t be easily quantified.”

        Possibly it has been quantified by those who do serious psychological studies for the advertising industry; what creates a psychological connection and “product loyalty”?

        I once read of a study where people were asked to make some small gesture on behalf of a “good cause,” in the form of placing a little decal or sticker in their window. Later, people were asked to do something very intrusive on behalf of the cause; put a large, semi-permanent lawn sign in their front yard. The people who had acceded to the first, petty request, were many times more likely to accede to the intrusive request, than a control group that had not yet been requested to do anything. The petty gesture had created a powerful “commitment” to supporting “the cause.”

        I have also been fascinated by the power of “subcultures,” but that’s another discussion.

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