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A Measure of Excitement?

One of the factors in determining the outcome of the 2012 presidential election will likely be how excited 2008 Obama voters are to get out and vote again. Think the Occupy movement knocking on doors and registering voters. Yeah, that will be fun.

But, with all that hate toward Republicans, how are those former Obama voters feeling about their guy this election? This might be one clue:

The uncontested primary of an unchallenged incumbent doesn’t mean much, but it can perhaps be taken as some kind of measure of intensity, partisan loyalty, or simple willingness to show up to and be counted.

And by those measures, George W. Bush handily defeated Barack Obama in New Hampshire last night.

The story compares the uncontested primary for Bush to the uncontested primary for Obama. But, there are also many data points lacking in the article. For example, how did each compare to the percentage of registered party voters? Regardless, we’ll have lots of points to compare once the primary really gets going.

Have any readers been visited by campaigns yet?

4 Responses to “A Measure of Excitement?”

  1. Dannytheman says:

    No one popping buy here. Maybe I will put my NRA voting signs out early this year!!

  2. Stranger says:

    No matter how Bam’s toadies at the Labor Department spin the numbers most Americans are well aware of our (real) 12% unemployment rate – and the fact that gasoline is expected to be above $4.00 a gallon before November.

    We shall see what we shall see – but I expect an attempt to wag the dog.

    Stranger

  3. dustydog says:

    This year will see Occupy rallies at voting places. Police intervention will be token, and mostly aimed at disarming voters. The blowback won’t matter – Romney won’t pursue voting rights violations against the police or Occupy crowds. Republicans living in target areas should vote by mail, or go in groups.

  4. Chas says:

    “…how excited 2008 Obama voters are to get out and vote again.”

    Many of them are now on life support, having lost the will to breathe on their own.

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