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Home Improvement: The Government Regulation Begins

Cue the looming threat movie music, please.

Today our contractor showed up and told me that we were due for an inspection. Eek! But hey, that’s why we hire professionals. The inspector arrived a couple of hours later and was very friendly and understanding. See, we got lots of rain last night and we have no gutters to guide rain away from the house right now. So all of the rain from the rear roof just falls off to the edge of where the patio will go – aka the piling holes. Mix that with the fact that we’re on the downward slope for quite a bit of the neighborhood and those those things are full. Technically, he could choose not to approve it until those holes are dry.

Fortunately, he’s not an ass, and in addition to showing up on time, he issued the approval with a note that the holes should be pumped first. He said he didn’t want to hold us up, especially because we could likely be done with this just in time for the warmer weather. He asked if we were looking forward to having a new outdoor living space. Yes!

So we passed inspection, the contractor came back by, and he said he would get in touch with the concrete guy ASAP to see about getting it poured. If he has finished up his other job by now, he could be by as early as this afternoon. If he can’t be by today, he’ll come by tomorrow if the weather cooperates.

Now, the big question. Should Sebastian & I carve a little something in the corner? :)

I kid about that last part. I know he’d hate the idea.

10 Responses to “Home Improvement: The Government Regulation Begins”

  1. FatWhiteMan says:

    Heh. I built an entire house without one permit or inspection. You gotta love Appalachia.

  2. Ride Fast says:

    That’s neat. Our inspector for the in-ground pool build was nice and efficient. Also a hard ass. She read the steel rebar contractor the riot act and got things installed right.

  3. A few years ago my former boss, a brilliant engineer, was in the middle of building a retreat cabin in the Sierras north of Sacramento, and gnashing his teeth about the clueless obstructionists in his local building inspectors office. He took off on a boat cruise down one of the Western rivers (can’t remember, might have been the Snake if it goes thru Montana). Anyway, he was admiring some of the larger houses on the wooded hillsides and remarking about how extensive the permit process must have been in such pristine and remote locations. The boat captain remarked that since those particular houses were in Montana, there was no permit or inspection required at all.

    The rest of the trip he was off muttering by himself, trying to plan a way to uproot himself from California so he could go to Montana and build his dream home.

  4. James says:

    “Should Sebastian & I carve a little something in the corner?”

    I don’t know about that, but I’d be tempted to bury about 300 rd.s of .357 sig (or your favorite ammo) before I laid the cement. You never know when that will come in handy.

  5. ravenshrike says:

    James’ comment gives me an idea. Put an imprint of each of your favorite calibers in one of the corners.

  6. danno says:

    How about embedding a penny with this year to show when it was installed.

  7. DirtCrashr says:

    Embedding a penny – or a spent LC 09 cartridge with the headstamp readable? :-)

  8. ZerCool says:

    I think the question is, more properly, not if, but WHAT you should put in the cement.

  9. Bitter says:

    They pour on Monday. Keep the ideas coming. It’s fun to consider! :)

  10. W. W Woodward says:

    You had to get a permit to build a covered patio? Where in the USSR do you live?

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