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Trouble in Illinois

Looks like they are pushing the “Lost and Stolen” crap there too.  Sounds like they managed to get a 3/5th supermajority requirement in that goes into effect on June 1st, which will raise the barrier for passing more gun laws in that state, so if this can be stopped now, it might have a hard time passing at a later date.

UPDATE: Kurt updates:

I didn’t make that very clear. It’s not that we managed to get a 3/5ths requirement–it’s just that the deadline for the end of the spring session is May 31st. The budget is such a mess that they’ll almost certainly have to call special sessions during the summer, so they’ll keep meeting, but anything passed during a special session must pass by super-majority.

Damn shame.  Imagine how much better off we’d be if it took a bare majority to repeal a law but a supermajority to pass one?

4 Responses to “Trouble in Illinois”

  1. Sounds like they managed to get a 3/5th supermajority requirement in that goes into effect on June 1st . . .

    I didn’t make that very clear. It’s not that we managed to get a 3/5ths requirement–it’s just that the deadline for the end of the spring session is May 31st. The budget is such a mess that they’ll almost certainly have to call special sessions during the summer, so they’ll keep meeting, but anything passed during a special session must pass by super-majority.

  2. ” Imagine how much better off we’d be if it took a bare majority to repeal a law but a supermajority to pass one?”

    Robert A. Heinlein proposed such a system in “The Moon is a Harsh Mistress”. One congressional body required a 2/3rd majority to pass a law. (If two-thirds can’t agree that it is a good law, then it shouldn’t be passed.)

    The second congressional body passes no laws. They merely have the power to rescind laws. But they only need a 1/3rd majority to rescind any law. The basis being, if one-third of the populace does not support the law – then it’s probably bad legislation.

  3. Smart guy, that Heinlein.

    Yesterday, the House adopted both “lost or stolen” amendments to the bill, so if the bill passes, someone whose gun is lost or stolen will have to report it to both the state police and the local police.

    Illinois, apparently, doesn’t want to take a back seat to any state when it comes to idiocy.

  4. Good news–the abomination failed.

    I knew by last night that it didn’t have a chance to pass both houses before the 3/5ths super-majority requirement kicked in, but to have it killed outright is vastly more satisfying. The ratio (47-64, with 4 abstentions) was better (considering this is Illinois) than I could have dreamed.

    Wahoo!

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